Amy Tuxworth Is a World-Wandering Storyteller

Photographer-turned-filmmaker Amy Tuxworth talks about heartbreak, feeling creatively frustrated and moving back to Sydney, from Berlin.

Introducing, once again, our internet soulmate As Seen by Her, an all-around wonderful platform celebrating modern women with ambitious, artistic and intelligent perspectives to share with the creative community.

As we always say here at Girls Are Awesome, representation matters, and highlighting these passionate and hardworking women feels like a resounding win for the whole world. Here’s the passionate story of Amy Tuxworth, a photographer-turned-filmmaker who is an inspiring proponent of the practice of following one’s own intuition. You can read the full versions of all interviews on asseenbyher.com.


Words by Amy Tuxworth
Photography by Amy Tuxworth

I’m Amy Tuxworth and I come from the very large Island, Australia. I started out as a photographer but have since moved into film. I was much more drawn to moving image as I like narrative, so for the last eight years I’ve been working in the film industry. I started out on the production side but I’ve ended up directing short form documentary films, which has taken me to India, Africa and around Europe. And I’ve just started making fiction. I most definitely think my calling in life at this point is storytelling.

I think if you’re a curious person with an interest in human psychology, being a filmmaker is a great profession. When I was living in Berlin, I worked with the online magazine, Freunde von Freunden and that’s where my interest in documentary began. I’ve recently moved back to Sydney, from Berlin, and since coming back my direction has changed from documentary to fiction. I’m currently in post-production for my first fiction film, Silenced – which is about a Muslim family who are dealing with the impact of Islamophobia in their Western Sydney neighborhood.

Looking back, had I not gone through heartbreak and moved back to Sydney, I’d probably still be searching and feeling creatively frustrated. I see my life as a constant flow, and sometimes when I’m swimming against the current, I know I need to make a change to get back in the flow. This is intuitive. So after coming back to Australia, I knew I was in the right place and that making this film is the beginning of something great. For me, it’s an important story, very close to my heart and the process has taught me so much about filmmaking – It’s like I’ve untapped something that was dormant and I can never go back.

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned, it’s that ideas are nothing unless they’re materialized. I think people are afraid of judgement but if you can just be honest and realistic with yourself about “failing” or not meeting your own expectations, you will get a lot more done, and ultimately learn from each experience until you’ve reached your full potential.